Rob's  Photography  New  Zealand
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Welcome to my New Zealand photography site!

The above sunset was taken at Peka Peka, which is near Waikanae in the North Island of New Zealand.

This site includes the following sections:

The  new  section includes a selection of images that have recently been added to this site.

The  top 10  section includes a selection of 10 of the photographs that have been very popular with visitors to this site.

The  landscapes  section includes photographs of mountains, lakes, rivers, seascapes, sunsets, and sunrises

The  floral  section includes photographs of gardens and flowers.

The  nature  section includes photographs of animals and birds.

The  other  section includes photographs of cities, buildings, tourist attractions, and other places of interest.

The  contact  section gives contact details, together with the disclaimer notice.

The  image index  lists in alphabetical order the names of all the images and articles on this site. By using the "Edit" "Find" function in your browser, you can search this page to find out whether an image or article you are interested in is on this site.

When you click on a thumbnail image that is displayed on this site, you will obtain a page that has an enlargement of this image. If the description of a thumbnail image includes an asterisk (*)  this denotes there is a sub-menu of images on this topic on the enlargement page. For example, if you click on the thumbnail image for the  Battle Hill Farm Walk, you will obtain several more images that were taken while on this excellent walk.


Recent additions to the site

A selection of the latest images to be added to the site can be seen  hereHere is a recent addition to the site:


A fisherman tries his luck in big surf spray at the point where Lake Ferry meets the ocean, Southern Wairarapa, New Zealand
Image captured with the full frame Sony A99 digital camera using the Sony 70-300G lens.

To obtain the best appreciation of the quality of the images on this site, they should be displayed at a relatively small size, because each image has been reduced in size to a maximum width of only 870 pixels, from the original width of at least 4900 pixels (or 6000 pixels from my full frame cameras). In addition, the images have been saved at a low quality setting.


Technical  articles

Some of the more popular technical articles on this site are as follows:

Advantages and disadvantages of cropping images to gain extra reach. This article also gives some examples of the calculation of focal length

 

Full frame cameras vs APS-C cameras:  Analysis of the crop factor and "telephoto advantage" of an APS-C camera

Note that Appendix 2 of the above article includes the following sections:

Calculation of pixel pitch

Calculation of the area of one pixel

 

Why is pixel size important - increasing pixel count increases noise?  (Click  here  to read the full article)

 

Pixel level vs image level in digital photography (also refers to the new  Studio Test Scene  published by Digital Photography Review)

 

Case study: High ISO low light images of the Sony A77 compared with those of the Sony A55

 

Downscaling and upscaling images for comparative purposes  (can apples be compared with oranges?)

 

Index of practical examples of the application of the "pixel density advantage" template

 

The following supplementary notes are designed to provide further information about how to compare the cameras listed in the above index:

 

Relationships between crop factor, field of view, photographic reach, image size, pixel density, and pixel size

 

Other technical articles on this site are indexed  here  and include articles about  determining print size, and  upgrading your digital camera.



Technical camera comparisons of pixel size, pixel density, reach etc.


The  Sony A7S  was announced in April 2014 and is a full frame mirrorless camera that has only 12.2 megapixels. The specifications for the Sony A7S are published  here. The A7S has very large pixels which makes it ideal for  low-light applications. The Sony announcement of the A7S, made on April 6, 2014, can be seen  here. It mentions in this announcement that:

"The innovative α7S camera features a newly developed, 12.2 effective megapixel 35mm Exmor® CMOS sensor paired with a powerful BIONZ X image processor, allowing it to shoot at a sensitivity range of ISO 50 – 409600 with unprecedented dynamic range and low noise.

The new model is also the world’s first camera to utilize the entire width of a full-frame image sensor in 4K video acquisition, and does this without cropping or line skipping as it can read and process data from every one of the sensor’s pixels.  This allows 4K video shooters to utilize all of the artistic and creative benefits provided by the unique sensor."

Click  here  to see a comparison of the image size, pixel density, and pixel size of the full frame Sony A7S with that of the 24 megapixel APS-C Sony A77II. The net effect of the large 116% “pixel density advantage” of the Sony A77II, is to produce a print at 200 ppi, that is about 16.1 inches wider (or about 116% wider) than that produced with the same field of view from the cropped image of the A7S.

 
The
  Sony A77II  was announced in May 2014 and is an upgrade of the Sony A77. Click  here  to see a comparison of the image size, pixel density, and pixel size of the APS-C 24 megapixel Sony A77II with that of the full frame 36 megapixel Sony A7R. Click  here  to go to a Sony website that gives a full description of the Sony A77II.

The  Sony A6000  was announced early in 2014 and is an upgrade of the popular Sony NEX-6. Click  here  to see a comparison of the image size, pixel density, and pixel size of the APS-C 24 megapixel Sony A6000 with that of the full frame 36 megapixel Sony A7R.
The Sony A6000 is a light-weight Sony E-Mount camera.

The amazing light weight, full frame, mirrorless 36 megapixel  Sony A7R  was announced in October 2013. Click  here  to see a comparison of the image size, pixel density, and pixel size of the full frame Sony A7R with that of the 24 megapixel APS-C Sony A77. The net effect of the 24.5% “pixel density advantage” of the Sony A77, is to produce a print at 200 ppi, that is about 5.9 inches wider (or about 24.5% wider) than that produced with the same field of view from the cropped image of the A7R.

The 24.3 megapixel  Sony A7  was announced in October 2013. In common with the Sony A7R, it is a light weight, full frame, mirrorless camera. Click  here  to see a comparison of the image size, pixel density, and pixel size of the full frame Sony A7 with the APS-C Sony A77.

 

The 20.2 megapixel  Sony DSC-RX10  was announced in October 2013. It has a 1-inch sensor (13.2mm x 8.8mm), and an excellent  fixed  Carl Zeiss 8.8mm - 73.3mm lens. In 35mm terms, after taking into account the crop factor of about 2.7x, this is equivalent to about 24mm -200mm. This lens provides a constant F/2.8 maximum aperture. Click  here  to see a comparison of the image size, pixel density, and pixel size of the full frame 24 megapixel Sony A99 with that of the Sony RX10.

 

The 20.1 megapixel  Sony SLT-A58  was announced on 20 February 2013. Click  here  to see a comparison of the image size, pixel density, and pixel size of the full frame 24 megapixel Sony A99 with that of the APS-C Sony A58. The net effect of the 39% “pixel density advantage” of the Sony A58, is to produce a print at 200 ppi, that is about 7.6 inches wider (or about 39% wider) than that produced with the same field of view from the cropped image of the A99.

The full frame  Sony DSC-RX1  was announced in September 2012, and it is an amazing  compact  camera with a  fixed  35mm F2 lens. The RX1 has 24.3 megapixels and a sensor size of 35.8mm x 23.8mm. The RX1 uses a version of the sensor that is in the new full frame Sony SLT-A99. Click  here  to see a comparison of the image size, pixel density, and pixel size of the compact Sony RX1 with the compact Sony RX100.


The full frame  Sony SLT-A99  was announced in September 2012. It has 24.3 megapixels and is the replacement for the 24.6 megapixel full frame Sony A900. The Sony A99 can produce amazing low-light high-ISO images, as demonstrated in  this blog.  Click  here  to see a comparison of the image size, pixel density, and pixel size of the full frame Sony A99 with the APS-C Sony A77.

Click  here  to see an interesting comparison of a 36 megapixel full frame camera, the Nikon D800, with a 24 megapixel APS-C camera, the Nikon D3200. This page shows that the 24 megapixel APS-C camera has about 26% greater reach than the 36 megapixel full frame camera, because its pixel size is about 26% smaller than that of the full frame camera.

In addition, click  here  to see an interesting analysis of the pixel density advantage (including pixel size) of a 36 megapixel full frame camera (such as the Nikon D800 or the Sony A7R) when compared with a 16 megapixel full frame camera (such as the Nikon Df and the Nikon D4). This page explains why the 36 megapixel full frame camera has about 50% greater reach than the 16 megapixel full frame camera.

The full frame 22.3 megapixel Canon EOS 5D Mark III was announced in March 2012. Click  here  to see a comparison of the image size, pixel density, and pixel size of the Canon 5D III with that of the Canon 7D. This page shows that, when compared with the Canon 5D Mark III, the Canon 7D has a linear pixel density that is approximately 45% greater than that of the 5DIII.

Click  here  to see an interesting analysis of the pixel density advantage (including pixel size) of a 36 megapixel full frame camera (such as the Nikon D800 or the Sony A7R) when compared with a 22 megapixel full frame camera (such as the Canon 5D Mark III). This page explains why the 36 megapixel full frame camera has about 28% greater reach than the 22 megapixel full frame camera.


Blogs

Click  here  to go to the index of blogs on this site. The blogs are casual short articles that deal with  triptych photographyrare visit of a leopard seal to Wellingtonvintage Sony memory sticksCanon wonder camera, thoughts on whether  photography is an art or a science, and  Sony A99 high ISO bird images in very low light.


Cameras  used  to  capture  images  on  this  site

My main camera is the incredible Sony Alpha 99, which is a 24.3 megapixel full frame camera. My main lens is the great 24mm - 70mm Carl Zeiss Vario-Sonnar T*. My telephoto lens is the the Sony 70mm-300 mm G SSM lens. The Sony A99 captures incredible detail and the images are suitable for making very big enlargements. I also own the very nice APS-C 16.2 megapixel   Sony A55 (SLT-A55V) camera. This camera is light to carry and I sometimes use it when on long walks in preference to the heavier full frame camera. I often use the excellent Sony 18mm - 250mm lens with the Sony A55. I also enjoy using the amazing  20.2mp Sony RX100, which fits in a pocket and is very useful when it is not appropriate to carry a larger camera. The Sony RX100 is also a very good video camera as demonstrated  here.

I designed this site using Microsoft Expression Web. I look forward to receiving your feedback about my photographs and this site.



 

Disclaimer and Limitation of Liability: The information supplied on this website is provided in good faith. However, this information is provided subject to the condition that neither Rob's Photography New Zealand, nor any person associated with Rob's Photography New Zealand, shall be liable for any errors or omissions in such information. In addition, neither Rob's Photography New Zealand, nor any person associated with Rob's Photography New Zealand, has any  responsibility in relation to any material you may obtain from any other website, even if you access it via a link from this web site. This website and all disputes or other matters arising out of it shall be governed by the laws of New Zealand and dealt with by a court of competent jurisdiction in Wellington, New Zealand. You specifically agree that if Rob's Photography New Zealand should prevail in any legal proceedings, you shall pay all of our costs.